National Honey Month 2018

SB18.jpg

There is nothing more amazing then learning something new every day. That is why we LOVE what we do at The Honey Cottage! Our customers learn something new about bees, or honey, or beekeeping every time they come in to see us. We find bees extremely fascinating and they teach us something every time we open up the hive. Every year to celebrate National Honey Month we get to talk even more about our favorite friends and what they make. So here are 9 facts about honey, bees, and beekeeping. Follow us on facebook, twitter, and LinkedIn to learn more about The Honey Cottage everyday!

1- Most of our clothes come from the cotton plant. Without bees pollinating the cotton plant we would not have cotton honey or clothes.

2- There are plants that can be planted in drought stricken areas that would help give the bees forage. Lavender, thyme, and sage are a few that survive wonderfully without lots of moisture.

3- There are some plants that will not bloom in their first year of being planted. Strawberries and clover are two examples of plants that take a year to put down full roots.

4- Plants and trees need rest just like we do; that is why a cold dormant winter is very important for them. They need a full rest to produce good healthy blooms for bees.

5- The nectar that the flowers produce has the natural sugars that bees make into honey. There is no sugar added to the process; these are natural sugars usable by the human body and bees.

6- If you are handed a candy bar; will you get up to get to the kitchen for some chicken and broccoli? That is the same thinking for bees; if you give them sugar water they will not go out for flowers. Honey is loaded with vitamins, minerals, trace minerals, and natural usable sugar. Why give bees something that has no nutritional value and weakens, just like humans, their immune system? Think about this; if you won’t eat it don’t give it to the bees.

7- Gardening takes time, energy, and effort. The rewards of seeing your flowers and plants bloom and make food is a big reward. Bees are needed for the flowers to bloom and make the fruits, vegetables, and herbs that we eat to sustain life.

8- Neonicotinoids sprayed on plants are known to attach to the bee paralyzing them and then attacks their central nervous system thus killing them. STOP USING PESTICIDES AND SAVE THE BEES!!

9- Bees will only cap honey when the water content has reached 15%-20%; each honey varies on amount.

Share with everyone you know and spread the word about how special bees are!! Help save the bees with us!!

From our hive to yours,

Bee Queen

Advertisements

National Honey Month!!

IMG_6710.JPGIt is our FAVORITE month of the year at The Honey Cottage; SEPTEMBER!!! That means it is….National Honey Month!  We LOVE having an entire month dedicated to bees and honey. Follow us on; facebook, twitter, LinkedIn for fun facts and neat pictures!! HAPPY SEPTEMBER!

1- Beeswax can get a frosty white appearance on it when it sits for a while. This is called bloom; it comes off easy by lightly wiping it off with a cloth.

2- Did you know that if you are baking with honey that you can lower the oven temperature to prevent burning of baked goods? About 25 degrees F seems to be best, but sometimes the recipe needs to be played with in order to get it just right!

3- Did you know there are bees that are called dwarf bees? They are about a quarter of an inch in size!

4- Drone bees and queen bees do not make beeswax; it is instead made solely by the worker bees. They have wax glands on their abdomen that discharges the wax. The drone bees have no wax glands, but the worker bees have four pairs!

5- A butterfly and a bee have something really cool in common!! Their mouth is called a proboscis; this is how they both suck up nectar!

6- Creamed and whipped honey means the same thing. It is whipped with whips to give it a smooth, creamy, spreadable texture.

7- The beeswax that the bees secrete is actually white! It is changed to yellow by the pollen that is brought into the hive!!

8- Honey dew honey is not from the melon!!! It is the only honey that is not made from a nectar source! Honey dew honey is from aphids; they eat the sap off of trees and leave a secretion behind. The secretion is then picked up by the bees and made into honey. How cool is that?

9- Want all the honey off of the measuring spoons and cups? Try warming up the measuring spoon so it goes right into the recipe! Or lightly grease them so that the honey comes right out of the cup!

Feel free to share with friends and family. The more everyone knows the better care we can take care of these amazing ladies.

From our hive to yours,

Queen Bee

IMG_6685.JPG

 

 

National Honey Month!!!

September is National Honey Month!  At The Honey Cottage everything starts with the bees and our goal to educate our customers.  So here are some super cool facts about bees that we wanted to share!

1- Did you know that bees have 5 eyes?  Three of them are in the front and two of them are on either side of their head!!

2- Beeswax cells start out as a circle, but the heat of the hive turns them into hexagonal shapes.

3- Bees go through four stages; egg-> larva -> pupa -> adult

SUPER COOL FACT: Bees can molt in the larva stage!!!

4- Bees can live up to 40 days, drones can live up to 90 days, and Queens can live up to 4 years!!

5- Did you know that the queen bee can lay over 2,000 eggs a day?

6- Bees collect nectar and pollen; from the nectar bees are able to make honey and beeswax

7- Depending on what the bees eat will determine the different flavors in honey comb

8- Bees do two types of capping in the hive; when the bee is in the pupa stage and when the honey is at the correct water level

9- Did you know that the comb in a hive is more sterile than an operating room?

Feel free to share with friends and family. The more everyone knows the better care we can take care of these amazing ladies.

From our hive to yours,

Queen Bee

IMG_3004

The Honey Cottage Beekeeping Adventures

This month has been super special for me; I put on the bee suit for the first time and was able to look in the hive. It was a neat opportunity to see what the bees do in the hive. Normally, I would get really excited and bounce off the walls. However, I have had to train myself not to be overly excited. One of the most important things that I have learned about being a beekeeper is that bees can sense fear, excitement and when someone is nervous. So putting on the bee suit was the best way to put everything I learned into practice; especially learning how to stay calm.

It was so incredible to be able to put into practice all that I have learned. To be able to be open up the hive by myself (with Frank’s direction of course) and look into the hive was beyond words. To see the frames of honey and brood was very educational because it increased my thirst for knowledge. Seeing pictures has been very helpful for me, but being able to actually have the hands-on experience was even better.

My head keeps saying I want to get closer without the suit; I want to take chances, and see what it is like having bees all around me. Thankfully, I have a fantastic teacher like Frank who finally sat me down and explained why it is so important not to take chances. I am excitable person and if I got stung I would not stay calm, this in turn would cause the other bees to attack because they now would feel threatened.

So I am very happy to say that I am thrilled to be a beekeeper. I always thought that it was too much and that I would not ever be able to be up close to the hive. I can’t believe that I ever feared bees. This in turn tells me what we need to do with our little one. I don’t want her to fear bees and want her to learn how important bees are for our future. Needless to say, beekeeping is so cool and I am so excited to be able to share my experiences as a new beekeeper.

I am very happy to say that we have been getting some great pictures of the bees and flowers that are bee friendly. A lot of our flowers are blooming!!! We have also been getting some AMAZING pictures of the inside of the bee hive as well as the outside. Stay up with us to see what we are doing here at The Honey Cottage!!!

From our bee hive to yours,

Queen Bee

IMG_2981

Beeswax

One of our favorite topics at The Honey Cottage is talking about Beeswax. Why? Because it really blows people’s minds when they find out what you can do with it. We have a lot of customers who have never used it or seen it. So it is a lot of fun explaining what beeswax is and its uses. Beeswax is a natural wax produced by honey bees. The wax is formed by wax-producing glands in the abdominal segments 4 through 7 of worker bees. The workers collect it and use it for structural material in the hive, natural made and naturally healthy.

Beeswax does so many things and is great for everyday use. Here is a list of what Beeswax is good for:

Stuck zippers Batik
Saw blades Sewing kit
Jewelry making (picking up gemstones) Squeaky door hinges
Strengthen fishing line Arthritis wax treatment
Art mediums Furniture polish
Salves and balms Leather softener & shoe polish
Mold making Iron wax
Envelope sealing wax Waterproofing corks
Chocolate sauce Ukrainian Easter eggs
Preserving flowers and leaves Dust mops & dust cloths
Waterproofing wooden cutting boards Golf Club grip wax
Modeling clay Putty (for sealing cracks & nail holes)
Spice sachets Waterproofing paper
Temporary glue Candles
Moustache wax Soap
Rustproof exposed iron & steel Skis and snow shovels
Crack and scratch filler Lubricant for belts and vacuum cleaners
Lubricant for sewing machines Lubricant for tools
Lip balm Mouth piece for didgeridoos
Book binding Shoe shining & lubricant

As you can see it is great for the outside, as well as the inside. Beeswax makes a great barrier on the skin allowing moisture to be locked in. Beeswax is not harmful so it is great in foods that need slight hardening and foods that need a little extra shine. Come to The Honey Cottage and see what it looks like!

From our hive to yours,

Queen Bee

Fun Facts about Bees and the Hive

Education about bees, the bee hive, honey, and bee hive products are so important to us here at The Honey Cottage. So in honor of National Honey Month we thought we would share some fun facts about the bees and the hive.

  1. There are three types of bees: the queen bee, the worker bee, and the drone bee. The queen’s only job is to produce babies and is the only one that eats royal jelly. The worker bees are all female, and the drone bees are all male. Worker bees do everything from taking care of gathering nectar to guarding the hive. The drones are only there to mate with the queen and then die once mating has taken place. Whatever drones are left are kicked out of the hive once winter hits.
  2. Honey has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties which is why honey never goes bad.
  3. Honey bees are the only insects that produce food for human consumption.
  4. Like humans, bees need to have a diverse diet of pollen and nectar to be healthy. Trees, flowers, shrubs, fruits, herbs, and vegetables (like squash blossoms) are all important for bees. This is why planting is so important not only to humans, but bees too.
  5. Bees dance to communicate!! They can also use their pheromones to communicate too!
  6. Bees can visit anywhere from 50-100 different types of flowers when they are collecting nectar.
  7. Beeswax can be used for candles, or to harden soaps and lip balms, or for simply waxing shoes, needles, or stuck zippers.
  8. Honey and bee pollen cannot be duplicated by man.
  9. Bees can sense fear, so do the best that can be done and stay calm when a bee is around. They only sting when they feel threatened.

Feel free to share with friends and family. The more everyone knows the better care we can take care of these amazing ladies.

From our bee hive to yours,

Queen Bee